Family Support Services

HeartShare helps parents and relatives manage the care of a loved one with a disability.

Supporting Families Caring For Loved Ones with a Disability

HeartShare’s Family Support Services offers diverse resources to families taking on the 24/7 responsibility of caring for a loved one with a disability. Through its respite activities, HeartShare enhances quality of life—for the family member who deserves a brief break from daily, attentive care, as well as to the child or adult with a disability, who enjoys the physical, emotional and social benefits of exploring the community with well-trained HeartShare staff and their peers.

Respite/Recreation

HeartShare’s diverse Respite/Recreation Programs in Brooklyn and Queens are customized to accommodate different groups of people, such as those on the autism spectrum or for those who use a wheelchair. Respite activities range from day outings across New York City to overnight trips in the greater New York region. HeartShare also offers unique overnight respite opportunities. To learn more, please call (718) 422-3292.

Options Reimbursement

HeartShare’s Options Reimbursement Program is a one-time grant opportunity that may be used for a range of costs related to special needs, including respite care, adaptive equipment, skills training, behavioral supports and camp, which help a child or adult with an intellectual or developmental disability attain a higher quality of life. To learn more, please call (718) 422-3290.

Children’s Clinical Evaluations Program

HeartShare’s Children’s Clinical Evaluations Program provides no-cost Psychological and Psychosocial evaluations to children who live in Brooklyn, who don’t have Medicaid and who have either suspected or documented developmental delays. These evaluations may be used for an eligibility determination review with the NYS Office for People with Developmental Disabilities. To learn more, please call (718) 422-3227.

Developmental Disabilities Services

“My daughter can pursue her passions without being marked as different.”